17.6.10

Procuring Food for the Fam

A large portion of our shopping is done in Nairobi (roughly every 6 weeks) and there are some basic items (sugar, flour, oil, toilet paper, etc.) that can be purchased in Bomet (about a 10-minute drive).  At Tenwek, there is a local "market" where you can purchase produce.  There are also some small dukas (shops) to buy other items.  However, there are ladies who regularly come right to our homes to sell produce.  How convenient for us!  I want to introduce you to some of the wonderful people who frequent our doors.





















Elizabeth (left) comes a couple times a week, usually with bananas (about $0.25 for a bunch) and/or pineapple (about $0.50 each).  Joseph (right) manages a local orphanage and sells eggs to produce revenue.  A dozen eggs cost 120 shillings (about $1.50).
























Shadrach brings cilantro, carrots, and beets (not sure if he's ever been able to convince anyone to buy the beets!).


























Lilly (left) is most noted for her spinach, but she also brings squash and other veggies from time to time.  Caroline (right) is who I rely on most.  She works as a househelper for the Whites, but comes every Tuesday with pineapple, onions, tomatoes, green pepper, and big mangoes that can be hard to find locally.
























Grace brings passion fruit, lettuce, spinach, butternut squash, and carrots.  She regularly tries to get me to buy a basket too, especially when we have visitors.
























Most people here use fresh cow's milk since it's about 4 times cheaper than boxed milk.  John and I haven't quite been able to make the plunge.  The kids drink it and we use it for cooking, but we're not a fan of drinking it plain or with cereal.  The Faders and McLaughlins are hard-core missionaries and have made the switch.  

We get 2 liters of milk brought to our door every weekday (3 liters on Fridays).  Usually, your househelper arranges to have your milk brought to your house.  For some reason, we ended up with a milk merry-go-round.  Our househelper (Sammary) brings milk to the Faders, the Fader's househelper (Edna) brings milk to the McLaughlins, and we get our milk from Lily (pictured above).

Here you see Abi carrying the McLaughlin's milk container.  Note the "Bioclean: Heavy Duty Cleaner" on the label.  Hmmm....  If Maggie starts to grow some big, hairy moles we'll know why!

All of these folks were quite astonished when I told them that we never get food brought to our door in America.  They gladly obliged when I asked for their photo to tell all of you about them.  Several promptly asked for a copy of their picture!  :)

7 comments:

Rhett, Megan, Claire, Ford & Gus said...

Interesting . . . the vegetable ladies are banned from selling door to door here. We have to go to the market to buy from them. Why am I paying 150ksh for a dozen eggs and you are paying 100ksh? Hmmm. I think there is price control here! We are boxed milk all the way - I just can go there - it smells gross.

John and Jessica Cropsey said...

Megan, we actually pay 120 for a dozen. I didn't realize my mistake until you commented! I think that price is even a little high. You can probably get them for 8-9 shillings each, but I figure it supports an orphanage. I hear you on the milk, but am all about giving it to the kids if they'll drink it. I have to add a little Milo to Elise's. Micah doesn't know any better. :)

The Drs. McLaughlin said...

Mmm, tasty milk. --Eric

Anonymous said...

I know you all have an Ann Arbor connection, because I read about you in the 'newspaper', so I wanted to let you know that there is still home milk delivery in southeast Michigan! Calder Dairy does the delivery. I have neighbors who get it.

Sandy said...

What a fun post!!! I loved seeing the pictures of your friends who bring by produce and other food!

hankwillisdds said...

Beets are excellent! Try peeling and slicing them about 1/4 inch thick. toss in a bit of oil, salt and pepper. Then roast them in the oven about 400 degrees for 15-25 minutes. They're also great grilled.

We get fresh raw cow milk weekly from some friends here in Idaho who have a cow. And they deliver it! :-) Our next door neighbor raises goats, but I'm not a big goat milk fan.

Kristin said...

Hmm. Your "fresh cow milk" post must have captured my imagination, because last night I dreamed about it...it was pretty bright red, like strawberries, and Jessica was drinking bunches. (Also, btw, in this dream, the McCropder men were cooking dinner for everyone. A hint? Prophecy?)