18.10.18

KHA Archaeology Day

*Written by KHA Middle School

The topic for Kibuye Hope’s Academy’s (KHA) first learning experience day was archaeology. It was a great topic because we knew so little about it, but were interested and wanted to learn more. 

First, we were asked the question, “What is archaeology?” and found out that it is a branch of anthropology, which is the study of people. More specifically, archaeology is the study of human history through objects.

Archaeologists must be curious. They often do not have much information about the objects they find. Sometimes they find artifacts (things that you can pick up and move) and sometimes they find features (large structures or things that cannot be moved). Technology helps them to ask good questions and to know where to look. They use satellite pictures of the earth to locate unusual dips or rises on the surface.

Our first activity was what the archaeologists would normally do with the artifacts at the end of their long search. We went down to our local trash pit and talked about how in hundreds of years, archaeologists might find our junk. Archaeologists often look at garbage from the past to learn about the people who lived at that time. We then divided into groups.  Each group was given a piece of modern day rubbish (a plastic soda bottle, an empty matchbox, Styrofoam packing panels) and we pretended to be archaeologists. Even though we knew what our objects were, we pretended they were mysterious and asked questions that archaeologists ask when they find an artifact. We asked ourselves, “who, what, where, why, and how.” One group was given a Styrofoam tray and after many observations we decided it could have been used as a make-your-own hat. You could stick feathers or flowers in it and it would sit nicely on a bun. 

Between our first and second activity we had recess. It was fun to play and eat the homemade archaeology-themed cookies provided by Aunt Julie B.

Next, we got to become archaeologists ourselves. There were mock dig sites where we could excavate ancient (or two day old) pottery and puzzle pieces. The digging process showed us how patient and precise archaeologists must be. It also called for a lot of teamwork.

When we got back to the classroom we wrote letters to our future selves. We placed these letters and a few extra items in a time capsule. At the end of the school year we will get out our time capsules and read the letters that we wrote.

After lunch, we planted a garden with Uncle Carlan. He did a wonderful job of having us work together to make something beautiful. God was the first and very best gardener. We enjoyed thinking about gardening like that as we divided into classes to some gardening ourselves. Middle school sectioned the garden into plots, 4thgrade got manure and seeds, and 1stand 2ndgrade picked out where we were going to plant everything. Everyone got there and planted the seeds, watered the garden, and had fun. It looked amazing when we finished. 

All of the kids walked out of school a little smarter. We got to learn so much about archaeology, but we also got to explore outside our classrooms, and spend time together as the whole school. Archaeology day was a blast!

14.10.18

The Kibuye Chimers

by Michelle Wendler

Two weeks ago, Kibuye's first ever chime choir had their debut performance! While at my parents house in California last year, I saw the chime set that we had used in their church years ago. It struck me that this would be a great way of teaching music notation, counting, and ensemble skills while at the same time blessing the community. Our chime choir is made up of both team kids and Burundian youth from the church. Check out the videos at the end. Enjoy!












4.10.18

Hidden Talents

by Jess Cropsey

We have an increasing number of visitors coming through Kibuye these days, bringing with them needed expertise and often goodies from the USA to share.  We certainly appreciate the skills that they offer, but sometimes it’s the ones that you don’t expect that are the most delightful.  

Recently, a team working with Sister Connection (an outreach to Burundian widows) stopped by Kibuye for the day to see what’s happening.  Before they even arrived, a woman in the group offered her services as a professional hairstylist.  Of course, many of the ladies on the team jumped at this opportunity and slots quickly filled up.  Everyone arrived with clean, wet hair and she cranked out 17 haircuts in 5 hours, working through her lunch break and braving the first haircut for a 1-1/2 year old.  


This handsome guy is mine.  :-)

First haircut!

That's a lot of hair!

Heather getting a lesson on how to cut Anna's hair

At the end of the day, she gifted us with her brand-new cutters, scissors, spray bottle, and drape.  As an added bonus, her husband (a plumber) went around fixing all of our leaky sinks!

A couple months ago, one of the ITEC team (who helped finish the massive solar project at the hospital) offered his expertise in 3D printing.  He adapted his college-level explanations for our 1st-8th graders, brought 3D printed models to share with them, and even acquired free licenses to a design program.    




When Julie and Logan Banks visited our team in 2014, Julie led the women through a worshipful yoga experience and also taught some ballet to our little girls.  


2014:  Julie Banks (center); Maggie, Elise, Abi, & Anna (left to right)

We get to benefit from her unique talents on a long-term basis now that her family has joined our team.  (Imagine game show hostess, drama and dance club director, party planner extraordinaire, pep rally leader, etc.)   

I’ve learned that anyone who visits has something that they can offer to serve this community (either missionary or Burundian) and am looking forward to seeing what other talented people God brings our way in the future!  
   

1.10.18

Many First Times

(By Ted)

When was the last time you experienced or did something for the first time? 


For our family, this past year has been filled with many first-time experiences. It was our first time moving to another country (France) then yet another (Burundi). It was Eunice’s first time learning to drive stick shift (awesome!). It was my first time getting a speeding ticket in another country, while in France (not so awesome). It was Toby’s first time attending a French preschool, where French was the only language spoken around him all day. It was Amos’s first birthday shortly followed by his first steps walking on his own. And the list goes on… 

For me, specifically in the context of the hospital here in Burundi, first time experiences are a daily thing. Such experiences typically come in the form of an operation I’ve never performed (that would be typically done by other surgical specialists in the US) or in a disease I’ve never treated or managed before (like osteomyelitis in children). Some of such first-time operations these past 3 months for me have included a cleft palate repair, an excision of gingival mass, a hip replacement, and an ectopic pregnancy. 

Before getting to Burundi, I knew I would be in a radically different hospital environment, and I expected to be learning a lot of new information outside the scope of my training and background in general surgery. With a few months now under my belt, I can attest that there is never a day that goes by where I am able to say to myself, "Self, you knew how to take care of every patient that you encountered today." Fortunately, there is a more experienced and well-seasoned surgeon, Jason Fader, available to mentor us and guide us through the foreign and unknown. 

Still, even for things I know and was trained how to do, the pre-operative workup, the intra-operative steps, and post-operative management are totally different, and I am essentially having to reprogram my mind how to think. For example, even a simple biopsy to determine whether a mass is benign or malignant is something which we nearly always obtain in the US to guide our management for surgical diseases. Here, pathology services are not available, and if we think a biopsy would be helpful, we can get results in a few weeks by sending a tissue sample back with a short-term visitor or teammate who is heading to the US in the near future. As another example, we have no CT or MRI imaging, so as a result, we rely heavily on physical exam and ultrasound. 

Having so many first times in the hospital context can be challenging and exciting at times, and can bring a sense of great accomplishment. Other times, it can trigger a sense of feeling overwhelmed, inadequate, or helpless. In the medical world, where competence and performance are valued and praised, you would be hard-pressed to find general surgeons (and other physicians) admitting to feelings of inadequacy, which would be a sign of weakness. Conversely, in the context of a mission hospital in a low-resource setting, I would say that you would be hard-pressed to find missionary doctors who are not experiencing inadequacy or helplessness at some level. And I think there is Biblical truth to be found in this. I am reminded of the 2 Corinthians 12: 9-10, when Paul writes: 

But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me. For the sake of Christ, then, I am content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and calamities. For when I am weak, then I am strong. 

I know that I don’t have all the answers, and that there is a steep learning curve of working in a mission hospital, which keeps me on my toes and keeps me humble. Though experiencing many first times is not comfortable, it is in this state that I am forced to turn to Jesus and to rely on Him, and this is good.